My Indian-Inspired Line of Clothing

Necessity may be the mother of invention, but I claim paternity, in the form of desire.

This morning, I’ve been thinking about what I’d do in the way of making clothing for myself if I had the requisite sewing skills (which includes creating the patterns and stitching cloth to fit the pattern). I’d create some linen trousers that resemble the churidar pyjamas worn by men and women in South Asia. Mine would be loose, but not too loose.

I’d make versions that reach the ankle, as well as versions that reach mid-calf. The latter version would be harder for me to wear in public, inasmuch as they would resemble capri pants. My sister-in-law thinks I’m a coward because I think capris for men should be fashionable yet I’m unwilling to be an early adopter to further the trend I think is (or should be) coming.

Because I sometimes like belts, I’d put belt loops in my pants, but I’d also incorporate what would amount to linen suspenders that would be worn under shirts; going beltless in my clothes would not result in pants falling to the floor with the addition of a heavy wallet in a back pocket.

I’d create linen kurtas, as well, though my version would not be as long as what I’ve seen online and in clothing stores in Indian communities in Dallas. Traditional kurtas fall below the knees; mine would end around mid-thigh.

My clothes, all linen, would be designed to wrinkle; in fact, wrinkled clothing would be a cornerstone of my fashion line-up.  My clothes would be loose-fitting, easy to wear, easy care.

I’ll need investors for this endeavor; I’ll need sewing machines, fabrics, training in how to sew, training in creating and following patterns, and (probably) someone else to finally get the work done to my satisfaction. Feel free to send me money if you want to be part of a frenzy of fashion that almost certainly will sweep the nation.

About John Swinburn

"Love not what you are but what you may become."― Miguel de Cervantes
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